HOW TO HOLD A TENNIS RACKET

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The way you hold a tennis racket determines the way the ball will behave when you hit it. There are all six popular handles for the tennis racket. They all have a place and purpose within the game. Once you have mastered the necessary grip. Next, moving to the more sophisticated handles will be straightforward. These steps will guide you to use all the handles as well as how to hold a tennis racket effectively.   

METHOD 1: LEARN RIGHT-HAND GRIPS

1. Master the basic grip. 

To place your hand on the basic grip, hold the kids tennis racket pointing outwards with your left hand. Extending your right hand as if you shake hands with the racket handle, and place the knuckle of the index finger on the small and inclined side of the handle to the right of the flat side at the top. Next, close your hand around the handle to make the same angle of the handle go diagonally, through your palm and pointing towards the base of your thumb. The basic grip features:

– The most basic right-hand grip in tennis.

– Standard for serves and volleys.

– Be difficult to work with lifted or cut punches.

2. Use the right-hand east grip.

To place your hand on the right-hand grip, start by holding the kids tennis racket pointing outwards with your left hand. Then, extend your right hand as if you shake hands with the racket handle, and place the knuckle of the index finger on the long flat side of the handle, pointing outward to your right. Next, close your hand around the handle to make the same angle of the handle go diagonally through your palm and pointing towards the base of your thumb. The right-hand east grip features:

– A classic and versatile handle which is good for direct or cut punches.

– Be popular but still used by many professionals.

– Be not optimal for the lifting stroke, either inbound or outbound.

3. Try the semi west grip. 

To achieve the semi-west grip, hold the racket pointing outwards with your left hand. Next, extend your right hand as if you shake hands with the racket handle, and place the knuckle of the index finger on the small inclined side of the handle and pointing down to your right. Then, close your hand around the handle to make the same angle of the handle go diagonally through your palm and pointing towards the base of your thumb. The semi west grip features:

– A handle that tilts your racket down, generating an upward shot and promoting a lifted blow.

– The revolutionary grip preferred by many professionals.

– Be not good for cutting punches or hitting low balls.

4. Achieve the West grip.

Start by holding the racket pointing outwards with your left hand. Extend your right hand as if you shake hands with the racket handle, and place the knuckle of the index finger on the flat side of the handle located at the bottom. Next, close your hand around the handle to make this same angle of the handle go diagonally through your palm and pointing towards the base of your thumb. The West Hilt features:

– Generating extreme lifted strokes.

– Be bad for low balls, cut punches, or direct hits.

METHOD 2: LEARN BACKHAND GRIPS

1. Use the upside-down East handle.

To achieve the East reverse handle, use your left hand to hold the racket in front of you. Next, point the handle to the right and orient the stringing area perpendicularly to the ground. Then, extend your right hand straight forward directly on the handle. Lower your hand until the base knuckle of your index finger is entirely on the upper side of the handle, and close your hand around it. The upside-down handle East features:

– The most common backhand grip.

– A versatile and stable handle can generate small, lifted punches or hit more directly.

– Be suitable for hitting low balls, but not so good for controlling high balls.

2. Try the east end grip or semi west upside down grip.

To place your hand in the position of the east or semi-west end grip, hold the racket pointing outwards with your left hand. Orient the stringing area until it is perpendicular to the ground. Extend your right hand as if you shake hands with the racket handle, and place the knuckle of the index finger on the small inclined side of the handle and to the left of the flat top. Then, close your hand around the handle to make this same angle of the handle go diagonally, through your palm and pointing towards the base of your thumb. This handle features:

– Used only by more advanced players.

– Be useful for controlling high balls and generating lifted blows.

– Be challenging to hit near the net and hit low balls.

3. Master the two-handed backhand grip.

The most common way to do a two-handed backhand is to place your dominant hand on the continental handle (base knuckle of the index finger on the upper right side inclined) and then place the other hand just above the semi-west right hand grip (base knuckle of the index finger on the lower left side inclined). This handle features:

– Be much more powerful than a one-handed setback.

– Severe cuts, volley, and stretch the arm for wider shots.

Tips

If you are a left-handed player, reverse to the “right” and “left” at each step. On the other hand, it is up to you where to hold the racket. Also, keeping it close to the head of the racket will allow you a different blow than holding it near the end of the handle.

Warnings

Do not hold the racket too tight or too loose. Holding it too tightly will limit your bumps and can make you drop the racket.

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